Blog


Published on by

Drumroll Please While We Introduce Our Brand New Vintage Luckenbooth.....

image_3 Here is one of our most recent designs and this has been engraved onto a metallic plate by our big fancy engraving machine.

If we are planning to design a new piece, this gives us a great way of seeing how it would look before we actually go about creating it.

Not all designs make it into actual products and we decided to put this one to our Facebook Fans so they could give us their view on whether or not this should make it into our collection.

We had some really lovely comments so we went ahead and made the piece and we are absolutely delighted with it!

 

vintage_luckenboothWe have created a brooch and a necklace and both made their debut at the MFR Christmas Fair that we went to on Sunday.

We have a number of products that have not yet made it onto the website but if you did want to find out more about this product then just get in touch.

Here is a photo that I took on my phone and I hope that you like it as much as we do!

Read entire post
Published on by

Silver Of The Stars Returns To Museum Of Edinburgh

 

 
 
Here is a great article in the Edinburgh Evening News  telling us about the return of Silver Of The Stars which you can see in the museum of Edinburgh until 21st September. 
 
It is a great opportunity to view a unique collection of contemporary Scottish Silverware.  The collection is made up of 10 drinking vessels including a vintage car-inspired whisky set for Harry Potter.
 
If you are in Edinburgh between now and September it is so worth a look: Tom Murray, the Deacon of the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the City of Edinburgh, says, “Scotland is home to a unique community of artists working in silver. Their work is held by some of the world’s leading collectors and the demand from galleries to show this unique collection has been overwhelming.” 
 
Read entire post
Published on by

A Quick Overview of Tain Silver And Our Ever Expanding Product Range

This video appeared on our Facebook Page recently and it gives our Facebook Fans a quick overview of Tain Silver and our wide range of hand crafted jewellery and accessories. 

 

Why not take a quick look? 

 

We have lots more videos  on our YouTube Channel which is a quick way to view some of our product collections. We will try to share more of these on our blog shortly. 

 

Read entire post
Published on by

Hand Crafted In The Royal Burgh of Tain

If you are considering visiting the Scottish Highlands then you should make sure you visit the Royal Burgh of Tain. This town is situated approximately 35 miles North of Inverness and we are lucky enough to have a great choice of craft businesses to choose from in the town.

 

Obviously there is Tain Silver. Our workshop is situated in the basement of local Jewellers M A Forbes which is placed on the High street. We have a large range of products on display in the shop, making it easy for you to browse lots of products at once. 

 

anta.jpg

Anta is famous for it's pottery, textiles and the lovely furniture that it designs and creates. Collected worldwide, Anta pottery is situated a few miles outside of Tain. If you are visiting Tain, make sure you take the time to visit the lovely pottery and their cafe is the perfect place to have a refreshment.

 



nairn-glasstorm.jpg

 

We love these fantastic glass baubles that were created by local company Glasstorm. This company is based in Tain and is headed by the very creative glass artists Brodie Nairn and Nichola Burns. Take the time to visit their excellent glass studio to see a wide range of their lovely products. 

 

tainpottery.jpg

Tain Pottery has some amazing products, the above photograph gives you an idea of what they have to offer. They have a lovely pottery which is situated just outside of Tain on an old farm. The pottery is based in a huge old barn which was restored by Tain Pottery. If you are visiting Tain then don't leave without visiting the pottery where you can find a huge range of their products on display. 

 

The Royal Burgh of Tain has so many different attractions, the above is just a taste. For more information just visit the community website - www.tain.org.uk

Read entire post
Published on by

Hilton Of Cadboll Stone Includes Earliest Depictions Of Jesus

Designs on the Hilton Of Cadboll Stone have been great inspiration for Tain Silver over the years.  This article was featured in the Scotsman today:
Stone detectives discover one of Scotland’s earliest ­surviving depictions of Jesus in Hilton of Cadboll Stone
THE identity of a mysterious figure carved on an iconic ­Pictish stone slab will be ­revealed this week as being one of Scotland’s earliest ­surviving depictions of Jesus.
For more than a thousand years, the aristocratic rider carved on the 8th century Hilton of Cadboll Stone, discovered in Easter Ross, was assumed to be a Pictish ­princess out with a hunting party chasing a deer.
But a new book to be launched on Wednesday says that the long-haired figure ­riding side-saddle and wearing flowing robes is of Christ ­riding into Jerusalem in the days leading up to the Crucifixion.
Martin Goldberg, one of the authors of Early Medieval Scotland: Individuals, Communities and Ideas, said he hoped his work would help kickstart a re-evaluation of the era known as the Dark Ages because of the lack of surviving written sources and show it as a time of intellectual ­vigour in Scotland with ideas flowing freely back and forth from mainland Europe.
Goldberg, the curator of ­Early Historic and Viking ­Collections at National Museums Scotland, described how he began his quest to discover the identity of the figure four years ago after glancing at the 2.5-metre tall sandstone cross-slab, a centrepiece of the museum’s Early People’s Gallery, and suddenly thinking: “You know, it doesn’t have to be a lady on that horse.”
The stone, which has a Christian cross on its reverse side, dates from around 800AD and is regarded as one of the finest 8th-century sculptures in Western Europe. It was carved following the conversion of the Picts to Christianity, celebrating their new religion.
Such Pictish carvings often showed hunting scenes because they represented an ­everyday activity which people would recognise. The evidence for the figure being female previously centred on the ­Pictish symbols of a mirror and comb also carved on the slab.
However, experts say only a select, educated few would have been able to interpret deeper significant “hidden”, and now thought to be Christian, messages, which were lost over time.
Goldberg said: “People have assumed the figure was female because it was riding side-saddle and we are used to the prim and proper Victorian ­image of women like that and of pictures of top-level aristocracy out hunting.
“But then I started to really think about it and I began to see that perhaps the two trumpeters behind the main riders on the stone had nothing to do with hunting and instead looked like they were performing a fanfare for an adventus ceremony welcoming a new king which would tie in with Jesus’s entrance into Jerusalem. It’s all very well coming up with an idea like that but then someone says ‘prove it’ and that’s the difficult part.”
Goldberg carried out extensive research across museums worldwide looking at carvings from the same era of Jesus on horseback, searching for similarities with the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. “I started examining other hunting scenes with riders and found a few of Jesus riding side-saddle. In particular, I studied one in the Coptic Museum in Cairo which was taken from Al-muallaqa church and shows a carving on a wooden lintel which is very similar to the Hilton of Cadboll stone with Jesus with long-flowing robes, long hair and riding side-saddle and ­entering Jerusalem.
“Jesus riding side-saddle can be ‘read’ as him sending a very personal message and wanting to appear humble, not a triumphant leader.”
Goldberg, whose findings were then peer reviewed by other experts, added: “All the elements started to tie in ­together.” The Hilton of Cadboll Stone stood on a chapel site in Tain, Ross-shire. Over the years, it was defaced, used as a gravestone and moved to Invergordon Castle before ­being donated to the British Museum. After protests, it was returned to the National ­Museum of Scotland in 1921.
The Glenmorangie Company, whose distillery lies near the chapel site, has funded a research project on Early Historic Scotland, of which Goldberg’s book is part.
Hamish Torrie, brands director of the whisky company, which uses a design from the lower half of the stone as the logo for its single malts, said the book was the latest in a line of “fantastic reveals” produced by the research team.
“When we started the project we didn’t want to see just a ‘signed off’ name plaque on a wall, we wanted to be actively involved and we are very proud to be associated with this work. When we did our re-branding, we went back to our roots and the Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a marvellous icon to work with. Today it’s on millions of bottles around the world and, by this, we’ve introduced the history of the stone to so many people.”
Hidden symbolism features elsewhere in the book with ­Alice Blackwell, the Glenmorangie research officer, revealing her finding that the elaborate engraving on some brooches from Early Medieval Scotland were meant to be “read” upside down by the wearer looking down at Christian symbols.

cadboll_stone.jpg

 

Designs on the Hilton Of Cadboll Stone have been great inspiration for Tain Silver over the years.  This article was featured in the Scotsman today:

 

Stone detectives discover one of Scotland’s earliest ­surviving depictions of Jesus in Hilton of Cadboll Stone

 

THE identity of a mysterious figure carved on an iconic ­Pictish stone slab will be ­revealed this week as being one of Scotland’s earliest ­surviving depictions of Jesus.

 

For more than a thousand years, the aristocratic rider carved on the 8th century Hilton of Cadboll Stone, discovered in Easter Ross, was assumed to be a Pictish ­princess out with a hunting party chasing a deer.

 

But a new book to be launched on Wednesday says that the long-haired figure ­riding side-saddle and wearing flowing robes is of Christ ­riding into Jerusalem in the days leading up to the Crucifixion.

 

Martin Goldberg, one of the authors of Early Medieval Scotland: Individuals, Communities and Ideas, said he hoped his work would help kickstart a re-evaluation of the era known as the Dark Ages because of the lack of surviving written sources and show it as a time of intellectual ­vigour in Scotland with ideas flowing freely back and forth from mainland Europe.

 

Goldberg, the curator of ­Early Historic and Viking ­Collections at National Museums Scotland, described how he began his quest to discover the identity of the figure four years ago after glancing at the 2.5-metre tall sandstone cross-slab, a centrepiece of the museum’s Early People’s Gallery, and suddenly thinking: “You know, it doesn’t have to be a lady on that horse.”

 

 

The stone, which has a Christian cross on its reverse side, dates from around 800AD and is regarded as one of the finest 8th-century sculptures in Western Europe. It was carved following the conversion of the Picts to Christianity, celebrating their new religion.

 

Such Pictish carvings often showed hunting scenes because they represented an ­everyday activity which people would recognise. The evidence for the figure being female previously centred on the ­Pictish symbols of a mirror and comb also carved on the slab.

 

However, experts say only a select, educated few would have been able to interpret deeper significant “hidden”, and now thought to be Christian, messages, which were lost over time.

 

Goldberg said: “People have assumed the figure was female because it was riding side-saddle and we are used to the prim and proper Victorian ­image of women like that and of pictures of top-level aristocracy out hunting.

 

“But then I started to really think about it and I began to see that perhaps the two trumpeters behind the main riders on the stone had nothing to do with hunting and instead looked like they were performing a fanfare for an adventus ceremony welcoming a new king which would tie in with Jesus’s entrance into Jerusalem. It’s all very well coming up with an idea like that but then someone says ‘prove it’ and that’s the difficult part.”

 

Goldberg carried out extensive research across museums worldwide looking at carvings from the same era of Jesus on horseback, searching for similarities with the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. “I started examining other hunting scenes with riders and found a few of Jesus riding side-saddle. In particular, I studied one in the Coptic Museum in Cairo which was taken from Al-muallaqa church and shows a carving on a wooden lintel which is very similar to the Hilton of Cadboll stone with Jesus with long-flowing robes, long hair and riding side-saddle and ­entering Jerusalem.

 

“Jesus riding side-saddle can be ‘read’ as him sending a very personal message and wanting to appear humble, not a triumphant leader.”

 

Goldberg, whose findings were then peer reviewed by other experts, added: “All the elements started to tie in ­together.” The Hilton of Cadboll Stone stood on a chapel site in Tain, Ross-shire. Over the years, it was defaced, used as a gravestone and moved to Invergordon Castle before ­being donated to the British Museum. After protests, it was returned to the National ­Museum of Scotland in 1921.

 

The Glenmorangie Company, whose distillery lies near the chapel site, has funded a research project on Early Historic Scotland, of which Goldberg’s book is part.

 

Hamish Torrie, brands director of the whisky company, which uses a design from the lower half of the stone as the logo for its single malts, said the book was the latest in a line of “fantastic reveals” produced by the research team.

 

“When we started the project we didn’t want to see just a ‘signed off’ name plaque on a wall, we wanted to be actively involved and we are very proud to be associated with this work. When we did our re-branding, we went back to our roots and the Hilton of Cadboll Stone is a marvellous icon to work with. Today it’s on millions of bottles around the world and, by this, we’ve introduced the history of the stone to so many people.”

 

Hidden symbolism features elsewhere in the book with ­Alice Blackwell, the Glenmorangie research officer, revealing her finding that the elaborate engraving on some brooches from Early Medieval Scotland were meant to be “read” upside down by the wearer looking down at Christian symbols.

Read entire post
Published on by

Website Under Construction

 

under_construction.jpg

 

We just wanted to add a quick note to let you know that our new website is currently under construction. While the main work has taken place, we have still to add lots more products and make changes to various sections. 

Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause and if you have any questions please get in touch at : info@tainsilver.com

 

 

Read entire post